You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Watch Auroras Here

Find out where else you can chase the light

It’s been widely reported that 2016 is your last chance to marvel at the wonder of the Northern Lights in this decade, as scientists expect the lights to fade and appear less frequently over the next ten years.

If you’re unable to make a trip to the Arctic this year, here are some good news – the Nordic countries aren't the only places where you can catch the beautiful auroras.

Aoraki Mackenzie Dark Sky Reserve, South Island New Zealand

Though it’s lesser known than Northern Lights, the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights is every bit as impressive as spectacular as the former. The best time to catch them in from March to September in the deep south region of New Zealand.

One of the most ideal places to catch the Southern Lights is in Aoraki Mackenzie Dark Sky Reserve, located in the Mackenzie Basin in South Island. This is the world’s largest dark-sky reserve at over 4,300km2, and is almost completely free of light pollution – making it a great location for star-gazing as well as catching the Southern Lights.

Mortimer Bay, Tasmania, Australia

With its big skies and unpolluted air, Tasmania is another fantastic location to watch the Southern Lights. Mortimer Bay in southeast Tasmania is a beautiful coastal reserve that’s also a favourite for sunset photography. Its secluded location makes it an ideal spot for chasing the Southern Lights – see above for a time-lapse video of the Southern Lights over Mortimer Bay.

Mohe, Heilongjiang, China

Nicknamed China’s Arctic Town, Mohe is the northernmost county in China and is the only place in the country where people can witness the midnight sun and Northern Lights. The county even throws a Northern Lights festival every summer – but do note that winter is your best chance to see the phenomenon.

For more on Living, head here. Or check out Where Do Singaporeans Go For Their Holiday Fix? and 5 Off-The-Beaten-Path Destinations In Southeast Asia.

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