The New Way To Exercise

Oh, boo. No more excuse to not work those muscles

There was a time when “The classes don’t fit my schedule” or “It’s too far” sufficed as excuses for not hitting the gym.

That time is officially dead. 

A new breed of exercise platforms is emerging, and they’re cleverly designed to suit our busy, busy lives. Now you can park a zumba lesson along the route you’re taking to your next appointment, or wedge in a quick but effective DIY workout beside your photocopying machine as you wait for your papers to be printed. 

Don’t know where to start? This overview of four such platforms will get you going. (And no more excuses, now.) 

1. KFit

Download the KFit app, sign up for a membership and you’ll have instant access to over 400 studios and activity centres in Singapore (other Asia-Pacific cities available too, for a separate cost; the folks behind the biz say a single global-access membership is in the works).

This fitness platform offers a vast range of exercise types, from the usual yoga and MMA classes to fun stuff like escape-room games, bubble soccer and paintball. We even spotted something called ganban-yoku therapy, where you lie down on “anti-oxidant beds” in a dry sauna. Just browse through what’s available by date and category, then book what you want with just a couple of taps.

Bottomline: If you want convenience and variety, this is the platform for you – KFit has a mindboggling variety of locations and classes; the most in Singapore, in fact. But note that it also has the largest customer base, which means popular activities may get booked out fast. (Like with all other such platforms, each class has a quota for members.) Sign up for $49 for the first month; $99 for subsequent months. Or just try out one activity per month for free. 

2. Passport Asia

This local startup with a presence in seven other Asia-Pac cities works much like KFit: You download the app, sign up and book sessions as and when it suits you. On offer is a good mix of “regular” activities and more unusual ones like kendo and parkour, from over 200 partners in Singapore. We like that there are specific categories for women-only and mother-and-child-friendly activities. 

Bottomline: A thoughtfully curated range of exercises at your fingertips. Unlimited memberships are $99 monthly (like KFit, you can just sign up on a month-by-month basis), which means you do get a tad less variety for the same price. But there’s also a $59 Basic Pass (four classes a month), a smart option for those who want to dip their toes into this whole new exercise thing. Or you can pick up a one-time Trial Pass for $9.99.

3. GuavaPass

This web-based platform positions itself as a more upmarket option. It’s got a stable of about 65 reputable partners in Singapore, including Crucycle, Como Shambala and Updog Yoga, but members also get access to other partner studios in Australia and the Middle East. Lots of yoga, pilates and circuit-training sessions available, with the odd Brazilian jiu-jitsu and K-pop dance class thrown in. You also apparently get entry to their “Bali retreat hideaway” – pity we couldn’t find more info on this.

Bottomline: Choices are somewhat limited but premium, which should suit those who are into more of a boutique feel. Note you don’t get unlimited classes though – there’s an average cap of three sessions per month at each partner studio. $99 for the first month and $139 per month subsequently.

4. Freeletics

“The secret to getting ahead is getting started.” “Stop crying. Start doing.” “We are all given the same amount of time every day – make it count.” Yep, tough love is what Freeletics is all about.

As its name, which stands for “free athletes”, suggests, this app offers no-cost fitness training plans which involve only your body weight (no equipment needed) that you can do anytime, anywhere. Pick one and finish it at your own pace. Along the way, you’ll be guided by tutorials and the 4 million-strong Freeletics community. You can even hire a cyber-coach and get customised nutrition plans (premium options that are chargeable). Is this the future of fitness? At the very least, it comes pretty darn close.

Bottomline: It’s free and you can work out anywhere you have enough room to swing a cat. What’s not to like? Self-motivation plays a huge part here though – it’s all too tempting to keep postponing that next workout because damn, each one is tough.

Photos: KFit, Passport Asia, GuavaPass, Freeletics

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