10 Places To Visit Before They Disappear

It might literally be your last chance

Venice
05 Nov 2015

Venice

Think of Venice and images of romantic nights under the stars and sight-seeing in gondolas come to mind. The city, one of the world’s most beautiful and romantic spots, has been gradually sinking for centuries and already experiences flooding four times a year. Add rising sea levels to the mix and you’ve got an underwater paradise waiting to happen. 

Maldives
05 Nov 2015

Maldives

If heading to the Maldives for an island getaway is on your bucket list, it’s time to start saving money. The picturesque holiday destination is Earth’s lowest-lying country (most parts are only 1.5 m above sea level, that’s shorter than an average Singaporean girl), and now faces rapid land loss due to rising sea levels, surface erosion and the mining of coral reefs. Researchers say it will be inhabitable within 100 years, and the Maldivian government has been buying land from other countries for citizens who may become displaced if the country does go under.

The Dead Sea
05 Nov 2015

The Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is known for its salt-and-mineral rich water, but all that is under threat — since the 1970s, the Dead Sea has shrunk by a third and has sunk approximately 24 metres, and dangerous sinkholes have also formed as a result. This phenomenon, largely caused by the diversion of incoming water from the Jordan River, could mean the end of the Dead Sea by 2050.

Glacier National Park
05 Nov 2015

Glacier National Park

It wouldn’t be called a glacier park without glaciers, but that is what’s slowly happening to the Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. There are only 25 glaciers left at the park compared to 150 in 1850, and they’re estimated to all disappear by 2030, all thanks to climate change. 

Seychelles Islands
05 Nov 2015

Seychelles Islands

With pearl white sand and baby blue seas, this African archipelago is probably what heaven looks like. But scientists fear the nation, made up of 115 tiny islands, will be underwater in 50 to 100 years, due to — surprise, surprise — climate change. A whopping 90% of its coral reefs died after the abnormal warming of its seawater, and islands are slowly changing shape and shrinking due to land erosion.

Forests of Madagascar
05 Nov 2015

Forests of Madagascar

Around 40% of the Madagascan forest has been destroyed from 1950 to 2000 by rapid deforestation. It’s not just about the loss of a scenic site — over 90% of its plants (some of which aid in the treatment of leukaemia and other cancers) and animals can only be found there. So if the forest goes, they do too.

The Taj Mahal
05 Nov 2015

The Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal’s deeply touching backstory turned us into sobbing messes, and now here’re more reasons to cry: Pollution and acid rain is causing the gradual erosion and weakening of the structure, and some say it might even collapse within the next decade. 

The Great Barrier Reef
05 Nov 2015

The Great Barrier Reef

It comes as no surprise by now that the world’s largest coral reef is declining. Since 1985, more than half of the reef’s corals have died or undergone coral bleaching, a result of rising temperatures and pollution. Head there now before the Great Barrier Reef becomes, well, not so great. 

The Great Wall of China
05 Nov 2015

The Great Wall of China

Another great facing destruction is The Great Wall of China. Tourism, weather conditions and even people stealing bricks from the structure to build houses (we’re not kidding) are contributing to the erosion of the 2,200 year-old wall. While conservation efforts are in the works, nearly two-thirds of the wall has been damaged or reduced to ruins.

The Alps
05 Nov 2015

The Alps

If you’ve always wanted to go on a ski trip on the Alps in Europe, there is no better time to do that than now. Global warming has accelerated the melting of the mountain range’s glaciers, and since 1850, almost half have melted away. 

Thanks to the over-consumption of natural resources and the mass destruction of Mother Nature, the natural world we used to know and everything in it, is slowly but surely eroding away. You may think the devastating results will only be visible in a couple of hundred years, but the truth is, some of the world’s most famous landmarks may even be gone within a decade or two. So grab the chance while you still can, and head to these must-visit destinations before it’s too late.

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